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image: Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

By | December 9, 2015

Commensal bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tracts of cockroaches lace the insects’ feces with chemical cues that mediate social behavior, according to a study.

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image: Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

By | December 6, 2015

The popular type 2 diabetes drug may cause profound changes in patients’ microbiomes.

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image: Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

By | November 30, 2015

A second doctor shows symptoms of ocular disease after recovering from Ebola infection.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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image: Week in Review: November 2–6

Week in Review: November 2–6

By | November 6, 2015

How Ebola hides from immune cells; gut microbes’ role in immunotherapy response; new mechanisms of hearing loss; butterflies use milkweed toxins to ward off predators

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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