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image: Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

Jet Lag Upsets Gut Microbes

By | October 17, 2014

Frequent airplane travel may contribute to obesity by throwing off circadian rhythms and changing the composition of the intestinal microbiome, according to a new study.

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image: Fecal Pill Treats Gut Infection

Fecal Pill Treats Gut Infection

By | October 11, 2014

In a preliminary study, patients with recurring Clostridium difficile infections found relief from diarrhea by ingesting frozen fecal matter from healthy volunteers.

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image: Supporting the “Good” Gut Microbes

Supporting the “Good” Gut Microbes

By | October 1, 2014

During systemic infection, mice kick-start the production of a specific sugar to feed and protect the beneficial bacteria in their guts while fighting pathogenic strains.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

Intensive Loss of Gut Bacteria Diversity

By | September 23, 2014

Lengthy stints in intensive care units pare down patients’ gut microflora, a study shows.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Gut’s Earliest Bacterial Colonizers

Gut’s Earliest Bacterial Colonizers

By | August 11, 2014

The pace at which bacterial groups take root in the gastrointestinal tracts of premature infants is more tied to developmental age than time since birth.

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image: The Body’s Ecosystem

The Body’s Ecosystem

By | August 1, 2014

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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