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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Week in Review: November 2–6

Week in Review: November 2–6

By | November 6, 2015

How Ebola hides from immune cells; gut microbes’ role in immunotherapy response; new mechanisms of hearing loss; butterflies use milkweed toxins to ward off predators

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: A Complex Disorder

A Complex Disorder

By , , and | November 1, 2015

Factors that likely contribute to obesity include disruptions to intercellular signaling, increased inflammation, and changes to the gut microbiome.  

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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