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image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

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image: Circadian Clock Transplant

Circadian Clock Transplant

By | June 12, 2015

Scientists establish a functional circadian rhythm in bacteria that don’t possess one naturally.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

By | May 13, 2015

Gut microbial communities from breastfed babies are slow to resemble adults’ microbiota.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: How a Popular Probiotic Works

How a Popular Probiotic Works

By | April 16, 2015

Eating a type of bacterium encourages the activity of other gut microbes, according to a small study.

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image: Mother’s Genes Influence Baby’s Bacteria

Mother’s Genes Influence Baby’s Bacteria

By | April 13, 2015

A breast milk-associated gene mutation impacts the establishment of a newborn’s gut microbiome, a study suggests.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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