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» gut bacteria and developmental biology

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image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

2 Comments

image: Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

By | November 6, 2013

Researchers show that the prevalence of one genus of bacteria correlates with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

1 Comment

image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Obesity via Microbe Transplants

Obesity via Microbe Transplants

By | September 5, 2013

Germ-free mice gain weight when transplanted with gut microbes from obese humans, in a diet-dependent manner.

7 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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