Advertisement

The Scientist

» gut bacteria and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

2 Comments

image: Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

Gut Microbes May Impact Autoimmunity

By | November 6, 2013

Researchers show that the prevalence of one genus of bacteria correlates with the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

1 Comment

image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

0 Comments

image: Obesity via Microbe Transplants

Obesity via Microbe Transplants

By | September 5, 2013

Germ-free mice gain weight when transplanted with gut microbes from obese humans, in a diet-dependent manner.

7 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

By | August 14, 2013

Two studies peg down how a bacterium indigenous to the oral cavity can contribute to the development of colorectal cancer.

1 Comment

image: Eat Less and Live Longer?

Eat Less and Live Longer?

By | August 13, 2013

Mice on a low-calorie diet harbor a distinct population of gut microorganisms that helps prolong life.

4 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  2. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
  3. Four-legged Snake Fossil Found
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
Cell Sciences
Cell Sciences
Advertisement