The Scientist

» gut bacteria

Most Recent

SP140, an epigenetic reader protein mutated in a number of autoimmune disorders, is essential for macrophage function and preventing intestinal inflammation, scientists show. 

2 Comments

Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

4 Comments

Person-to-person transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in US hospitals may be occurring without symptoms, a new study suggests. 

1 Comment

image: Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

By | May 25, 2016

Alzheimer’s disease–associated amyloid-β peptides trap microbes in the brains of mice and in the guts of nematodes, a study shows. 

1 Comment

image: Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

By | April 28, 2016

Donor bacteria coexist with a recipient’s own for three months after a fecal transplant.

2 Comments

image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

0 Comments

image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

By | January 13, 2016

A low-fiber diet decimated the diversity of bacterial species in mice colonized with human gut microbes in a recent study.

0 Comments

image: Counting Cells

Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science
    News Analysis What Budget Cuts Might Mean for US Science

    A look at the historical effects of downsized research funding suggests that the Trump administration’s proposed budget could hit early-career scientists the hardest.  

  2. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  3. Opinion: On “The Impact Factor Fallacy”
  4. Unstructured Proteins Help Tardigrades Survive Desiccation
Business Birmingham