The Scientist

» hESCs, microbiology and evolution

Most Recent

image: All Eyes On Stem Cells

All Eyes On Stem Cells

By | October 1, 2014

See the striking images behind the quest to develop stem cell therapeutics for vision disorders.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>

Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection

By | October 1, 2014

In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.

0 Comments

image: Eyes on the Prize

Eyes on the Prize

By | October 1, 2014

A handful of stem cell therapeutics for vision disorders are showing promise in early-stage trials, and still more are in development. But there’s a long road to travel before patients see real benefit.  

3 Comments

image: Predator Demoted

Predator Demoted

By | October 1, 2014

Extinct, giant arthropods, long assumed to be top predators of ancient seas, didn’t have sharp enough eyesight to be refined hunters.

1 Comment

image: Sleep Tight

Sleep Tight

By | October 1, 2014

Bed bugs are but one example of a species whose populations have evolved in response to human behavior.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

0 Comments

image: The Rainbow Connection

The Rainbow Connection

By | October 1, 2014

Color vision as we know it resulted from one fortuitous genetic event after another.

5 Comments

image: Soil Microbiome of Central Park

Soil Microbiome of Central Park

By | September 30, 2014

Nearly 600 soil samples from New York City’s famous park reveal that the urban environment harbors just as much biodiversity as natural ecosystems across the globe.

1 Comment

image: Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

Cave-dwelling Fish Fail to Keep Time

By | September 25, 2014

Tetra fish adapted to extreme darkness lose circadian metabolic rhythms to conserve energy, according to a study. 

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes
  2. Effects of Neanderthal DNA on Modern Humans
  3. Flux and Uncertainty in the CRISPR Patent Landscape
  4. Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?
RayBiotech