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image: Another Way Fiber Is Filling

Another Way Fiber Is Filling

By | April 29, 2014

Acetate, a short-chain fatty acid released following the fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, accumulates in the brain and can affect appetite in mice.

4 Comments

image: Genetic Brain Disorder Explained

Genetic Brain Disorder Explained

By | April 25, 2014

Researchers uncover a mutation responsible for a rare neurological condition.

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image: Does Brain Training Work?

Does Brain Training Work?

By | April 21, 2014

Experts are skeptical about the effectiveness of games that claim to improve cognitive function. 

10 Comments

image: Adult-to-Stem Cells

Adult-to-Stem Cells

By | April 21, 2014

An international team has created human embryonic stem cells from adult skin cells for the first time.

2 Comments

image: How Artistic Brains Differ

How Artistic Brains Differ

By | April 18, 2014

A study reveals structural differences between the brains of artists and non-artists.

3 Comments

image: Triggering Resilience to Depression

Triggering Resilience to Depression

By | April 17, 2014

In mice, boosting depression-causing activity in neurons can actually reverse depressive symptoms.

4 Comments

image: A Face to Remember

A Face to Remember

By | April 17, 2014

Researchers show that a tuning algorithm can make one’s profile photo more memorable.

5 Comments

image: Vegetative States Probed with PET

Vegetative States Probed with PET

By | April 17, 2014

Researchers find that positron emission tomography scans can help determine the degree to which some vegetative patients retain consciousness.

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image: Origins of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Uncovered

Origins of Flesh-Eating Bacteria Uncovered

By | April 15, 2014

Researchers construct a family tree of group A Streptococcus to trace the evolution of a “flesh-eating” strain.

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image: Sex-Biased Alzheimer’s Variant

Sex-Biased Alzheimer’s Variant

By | April 14, 2014

Women with a notorious variant of a gene involved in Alzheimer’s, APOE4, are much more likely than men with the variant to develop the neurodegenerative disease.

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