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image: Humans Never Stopped Evolving

Humans Never Stopped Evolving

By | August 1, 2016

The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

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image: Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

By | July 28, 2016

Genomic analysis reveals wolves and coyotes have hybridized, potentially complicating wolves' protection under the US Endangered Species Act.

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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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image: Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

Primates, Gut Microbes Evolved Together

By | July 21, 2016

Symbiotic gut bacteria evolved and diverged along with ape and human lineages, researchers find. 

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

Another Dinosaur with Short Arms Discovered

By | July 14, 2016

Gualicho shinyae evolved small limbs independently of T. rex, researchers report.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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