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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

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image: Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

By | February 1, 2017

See how different environmental conditions affect the activity of a molecule sensitive to both light and temperature.

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image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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image: Image of the Day: Linked Out

Image of the Day: Linked Out

By | January 26, 2017

A study provides the first visual evidence that cytofilaments tunnel through a cell’s nucleus to the extracellular matrix.

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image: Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

By | January 20, 2017

Researchers find diverse ways that the molecules can regulate cancer’s spread.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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