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» extremophiles and immunology

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image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Extreme Living

Extreme Living

By | February 1, 2015

Take a tour of deep-sea methane seeps and meet the organisms that call these extreme environments home.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

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image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

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image: Viral Virtuosos

Viral Virtuosos

By | February 1, 2015

New understanding of noncoding RNAs may solve a long-standing puzzle about how viruses orchestrate lifelong infections.  

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Interferon Discoverer Dies

Interferon Discoverer Dies

By | January 26, 2015

Jean Lindemann, the virologist who helped figure out that interferons were responsible for anti-viral responses, has passed away at age 90.

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

2 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

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