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image: Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

Small-Brained Fish Make More Babies

By | July 12, 2012

Guppies with experimentally shrunken brains produced more offspring than guppies bred for larger noggins, confirming a long suspected tradeoff of bigger brains.

6 Comments

image: Genetic Shift in Salmon

Genetic Shift in Salmon

By | July 12, 2012

A new study finds that an Alaskan population of the fish has quickly evolved in response to warming temperatures.

1 Comment

image: Mass Extinctions Set the Pace

Mass Extinctions Set the Pace

By | July 4, 2012

The rate of evolution is affected for millenia after mass extinctions.

6 Comments

image: War-born Climate Change

War-born Climate Change

By | July 3, 2012

A nuclear war could have profound effects on crops yields around the world, according to a new study.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: One Microbe’s 15 Minutes

Opinion: One Microbe’s 15 Minutes

By | July 3, 2012

The recently hyped amoeba-flagellate Collodictyon has many secrets to tell about early eukaryotic evolution.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2012

Evolving, The Moral Molecule, Aping Mankind, and Experiment Eleven

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2012

July 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

2 Comments

image: EPA to Regulate Greenhouse Emissions

EPA to Regulate Greenhouse Emissions

By | June 28, 2012

A federal appeals court upholds the Environmental Protection Agency’s right to regulate air pollution under the Clean Air Act.

1 Comment

image: Mixed Report for Oiled Salt Marshes

Mixed Report for Oiled Salt Marshes

By | June 25, 2012

Louisiana’s salt marshes are recovering from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but some areas have been irreversibly lost.

3 Comments

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