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image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

7 Comments

image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Masterpieces

Microbial Masterpieces

By | February 12, 2015

Artist Anicka Yi explores the beauty of bacteria.

0 Comments

image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

1 Comment

image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

2 Comments

image: Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Could Cut Biofuel Costs

Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Could Cut Biofuel Costs

By | February 2, 2015

Ethanol-producing Zymomonas mobilis can live on nitrogen gas, potentially cutting costs and environmental waste in biofuel production.

3 Comments

image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

0 Comments

image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

1 Comment

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