The Scientist

» bacteria and immunology

Most Recent

image: NYC Rats Harbor Plague Fleas

NYC Rats Harbor Plague Fleas

By | March 3, 2015

Researchers find Oriental rat fleas, the insects that can carry plague bacteria, on New York City-dwelling rodents.

0 Comments

image: Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

By | March 2, 2015

The number of deaths attributable to certain medical probes may go beyond a recent outbreak in Los Angeles.

2 Comments

image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

7 Comments

image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

4 Comments

image: Microbial Masterpieces

Microbial Masterpieces

By | February 12, 2015

Artist Anicka Yi explores the beauty of bacteria.

0 Comments

image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

1 Comment

image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

0 Comments

image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

1 Comment

image: Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Could Cut Biofuel Costs

Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterium Could Cut Biofuel Costs

By | February 2, 2015

Ethanol-producing Zymomonas mobilis can live on nitrogen gas, potentially cutting costs and environmental waste in biofuel production.

3 Comments

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS