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image: Antifungal Permits Flu?

Antifungal Permits Flu?

By | November 21, 2013

A common fungus-fighting drug increases the susceptibility of mice to influenza infections.

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

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image: Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

By | November 18, 2013

In lab experiments, bacteria usurp small, damaged fragments of DNA, including those from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth.  

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 18, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

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image: Astrogerm

Astrogerm

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers find a new bacterial species lurking in clean rooms used to assemble spacecraft at NASA and the European Space Agency.

2 Comments

image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

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