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image: Bioluminescence Researcher Dies

Bioluminescence Researcher Dies

By | August 12, 2014

Harvard biochemist J. Woodland Hastings, who first theorized about quorum sensing in the late 1960s, succumbed to pulmonary fibrosis last week at age 87.

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: The Body’s Ecosystem

The Body’s Ecosystem

By | August 1, 2014

Research on the human microbiome is booming, and scientists have moved from simply taking stock of gut flora to understanding the influence of microbes throughout the body.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Mobile Microbiome

Mobile Microbiome

By | June 26, 2014

Cell phones are populated with many bacteria commonly found on users’ hands. 

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image: Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Film Stars

Film Stars

By | June 1, 2014

Engineered bacteria can shape electricity-conducting nanowires.

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