Advertisement

The Scientist

» bacteria and immunology

Most Recent

image: The Promise of Panda Poop

The Promise of Panda Poop

By | August 30, 2011

The dung of the bamboo-loving bears contains bacteria that could be the next best thing for biofuels production.

0 Comments

image: Q&A: Preserving The Body's Bugs

Q&A: Preserving The Body's Bugs

By | August 24, 2011

The overuse of antibiotics could be threatening humans' microbiome—and Martin Blaser is on a mission to save it.

18 Comments

image: Opinion: Reducing Foodborne Illness

Opinion: Reducing Foodborne Illness

By | August 22, 2011

New testing technologies and improved communication among regulatory agencies are making strides in the fight against foodborne disease.

27 Comments

image: Bacteria Kamikazes

Bacteria Kamikazes

By | August 16, 2011

Researchers design a synthetic bacterium that kills the infectious microbe Pseudomonas aeruginosa, sacrificing itself in the process.

21 Comments

image: Arsenic-Based Life, Open to Critique

Arsenic-Based Life, Open to Critique

By | August 10, 2011

A researcher is repeating the controversial experiments that suggested a bacterium used arsenic rather than phosphorus in its DNA—with the world watching.

9 Comments

image: A Chronic Lyme Biomarker?

A Chronic Lyme Biomarker?

By | August 8, 2011

Researchers identify an antibody profile that may mark patients who suffer persistent symptoms of the tick-borne disease.

6 Comments

image: Bellybutton Bugs

Bellybutton Bugs

By | August 4, 2011

Researchers take pictures and analyze bacterial cultures from the bellybuttons of hundreds of American volunteers.

0 Comments

image: Baruj Benacerraf Dies

Baruj Benacerraf Dies

By | August 3, 2011

The Nobel Prize winner who discovered the gene that encodes the major histocompatibility complex passes away at age 90.

0 Comments

image: Top 7 in Immunology

Top 7 in Immunology

By | August 2, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in microbiology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: String Theory

String Theory

By | August 1, 2011

New types of biological filaments are turning up in yeast, fly, bacterial cells and in rat neurons, and they may yield clues to how the cytoskeleton evolved from metabolically active enzymes.

6 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist