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image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

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image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.

2 Comments

image: Antifungal Permits Flu?

Antifungal Permits Flu?

By | November 21, 2013

A common fungus-fighting drug increases the susceptibility of mice to influenza infections.

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

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image: Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

Bacteria Can Integrate Degraded DNA

By | November 18, 2013

In lab experiments, bacteria usurp small, damaged fragments of DNA, including those from a 43,000-year-old woolly mammoth.  

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 18, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

20 Comments

image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Microbial Mediators

Microbial Mediators

By | November 11, 2013

Researchers show that symbiotic bacteria can help hyenas communicate with one another.

1 Comment

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