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image: Sensing Calories Without Taste

Sensing Calories Without Taste

By | April 22, 2013

Rodents and fruit flies appear to be able to sense nutrients even when they can’t taste the food they’re eating. Now, researchers are trying to figure out how.

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Mighty Modifications

Mighty Modifications

By | April 1, 2013

Histone acetylation levels keep intracellular pH in check.

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image: Life in Lake Vostok?

Life in Lake Vostok?

By | March 13, 2013

Researchers analyzing samples from Antarctic subglacial lake confirm they have found unknown bacteria, and claim the microbes come from the lake rather than contaminants.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

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image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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image: Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

By | March 6, 2013

The nanoscale structure of a clanger cicada’s wings destroys threatening microbes on contact.

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image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.

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image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

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