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The Scientist

» bacteria and developmental biology

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Life in Lake Vostok?

Life in Lake Vostok?

By | March 13, 2013

Researchers analyzing samples from Antarctic subglacial lake confirm they have found unknown bacteria, and claim the microbes come from the lake rather than contaminants.

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image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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image: Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

By | March 6, 2013

The nanoscale structure of a clanger cicada’s wings destroys threatening microbes on contact.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Blue Biotech

Blue Biotech

By | March 1, 2013

Systems biologist Lone Gram describes her approach to combing the oceans for novel compounds that may be useful in the fight against pathogens.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Sea Change

Sea Change

By | March 1, 2013

A normally land-based microbiologist sets sail to find the building blocks of novel antibiotics in marine bacteria.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Ice Lake Home to Life

Ice Lake Home to Life

By | February 8, 2013

Researchers have found evidence of microbial life in samples taken from a lake hidden beneath 800 meters of Antarctic ice, but it’s not yet clear how the bacteria survive.

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