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The Scientist

» bacteria and developmental biology

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image: Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

Insect Wing Kills Bacteria

By | March 6, 2013

The nanoscale structure of a clanger cicada’s wings destroys threatening microbes on contact.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Blue Biotech

Blue Biotech

By | March 1, 2013

Systems biologist Lone Gram describes her approach to combing the oceans for novel compounds that may be useful in the fight against pathogens.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Sea Change

Sea Change

By | March 1, 2013

A normally land-based microbiologist sets sail to find the building blocks of novel antibiotics in marine bacteria.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Ice Lake Home to Life

Ice Lake Home to Life

By | February 8, 2013

Researchers have found evidence of microbial life in samples taken from a lake hidden beneath 800 meters of Antarctic ice, but it’s not yet clear how the bacteria survive.

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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