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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Engineered Bacteria Build Carbon-Silicon Bonds

Engineered Bacteria Build Carbon-Silicon Bonds

By | November 29, 2016

Researchers tweak bacterial proteins, turning them into powerful enzymes capable of producing silicon-carbon compounds naturally and more efficiently than manmade catalysts.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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image: TS Picks: October 17, 2016

TS Picks: October 17, 2016

By | October 17, 2016

Problematic dietary advice; the man whose cells were fixed with CRISPR; treating toads

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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