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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Scalp Microbiome Linked to Dandruff Severity

Scalp Microbiome Linked to Dandruff Severity

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers identify differences in the composition of microbial species living on the scalps of people with different levels of dandruff.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

Contacts May Affect Eye Microbiome

By | March 23, 2016

The bacterial communities in the eyes of contact lens wearers resemble those of the skin, according to a study. 

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image: Microbial Miners

Microbial Miners

By | March 22, 2016

Bacteria play an important role in cycling naturally occurring platinum group metals, scientists show.

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image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

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