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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

By | July 29, 2015

A US Army lab shipped live spores of the deadly bacterium because of improper irradiation protocols, a Department of Defense review has found.

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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