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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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image: Cas9 Proofreads Gene Edits

Cas9 Proofreads Gene Edits

By | November 13, 2015

The gene-editing CRISPR/Cas9 system has three checkpoints to ensure it alters the right section of DNA.

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Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Negative Thinking

Negative Thinking

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers uncover the first light-controlled negative-ion channels in algae, and they are fast.

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