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image: Vitamin C Slays TB Bacteria

Vitamin C Slays TB Bacteria

By | May 21, 2013

The essential nutrient can kill drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by producing oxidative radicals that damage DNA.

1 Comment

image: Decoding Bacterial Methylomes

Decoding Bacterial Methylomes

By | May 15, 2013

A new technique could soon spur unprecedented insight into the role of bacterial epigenetics in the evolution of pathogen virulence.

1 Comment

image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.

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image: Electric Microbe Hairs

Electric Microbe Hairs

By | May 1, 2013

USC researcher Mohamed El-Naggar demonstrates how some bacteria grow electrical wires that allow them to link up in big biological circuits.

1 Comment

image: Electron Shuffle

Electron Shuffle

By | May 1, 2013

Shewanella bacteria generate energy for survival by transporting electrons to nearby mineral surfaces.

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image: We're All Connected

We're All Connected

By | May 1, 2013

A look at some of biology’s communication networks

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image: Live Wires

Live Wires

By | May 1, 2013

Discoveries of microbial communities that transfer electrons between cells and across relatively long distances are launching a new field of microbiology.

2 Comments

image: Bacteria Make Diesel Molecules

Bacteria Make Diesel Molecules

By | April 24, 2013

By engineering the genome of E. coli with genes from several sources, scientists have coaxed the microbe to produce diesel-replica hydrocarbons.

1 Comment

image: Life in Lake Vostok?

Life in Lake Vostok?

By | March 13, 2013

Researchers analyzing samples from Antarctic subglacial lake confirm they have found unknown bacteria, and claim the microbes come from the lake rather than contaminants.

1 Comment

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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