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» zebrafish, evolution and developmental biology

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image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.

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image: Models of Transparency

Models of Transparency

By , , , and | April 1, 2013

Researchers are taking advantage of small, transparent zebrafish embryos and larvae—and a special strain of see-through adults—to understand the development and spread of cancer.

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image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

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image: Fish Brain on Film

Fish Brain on Film

By | March 19, 2013

Improvements in light-sheet microscopy enable real-time activity imaging of almost every neuron in the brain of zebrafish larvae.

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image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.

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