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image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Shingo Kajimura: Fishing for Answers

Shingo Kajimura: Fishing for Answers

By | November 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 39

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image: The Skinny on Fat Cells

The Skinny on Fat Cells

By | November 1, 2015

Bruce Spiegelman has spent his career at the forefront of adipocyte differentiation and metabolism.

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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