The Scientist

» brown fat and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

0 Comments

image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

0 Comments

image: Shingo Kajimura: Fishing for Answers

Shingo Kajimura: Fishing for Answers

By | November 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 39

1 Comment

image: The Skinny on Fat Cells

The Skinny on Fat Cells

By | November 1, 2015

Bruce Spiegelman has spent his career at the forefront of adipocyte differentiation and metabolism.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

0 Comments

image: Warming Up to Brown Fat

Warming Up to Brown Fat

By | October 8, 2015

Scientists know how to turn on these fat-combusting cells. Can these energy burners be used to combat obesity?

6 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

0 Comments

image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
  4. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
RayBiotech