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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Fat Injection Slims Obese Mice

Fat Injection Slims Obese Mice

By | April 7, 2015

Transplanting energy-burning brown fat can prevent excess weight gain in a mouse model of obesity.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Irisin Skepticism Goes Way Back

Irisin Skepticism Goes Way Back

By | March 18, 2015

Post-publication peer reviewers had questioned data about the supposed fat-browning enzyme from the get-go.

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image: Drug Stimulates Brown Fat

Drug Stimulates Brown Fat

By | January 28, 2015

A small study finds that an approved medication increases metabolic rate and the activity of thermogenic brown fat in men.

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image: Brain’s Role in Browning White Fat

Brain’s Role in Browning White Fat

By | January 15, 2015

Insulin and leptin act on specialized neurons in the mouse hypothalamus to promote conversion of white to beige fat.

1 Comment

image: Drug Spurs Digestion

Drug Spurs Digestion

By | January 6, 2015

A new drug shows promise as a weight-loss solution in mice, prompting the animals to burn calories in the absence of a meal.

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