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image: Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

By | July 10, 2015

Investigators find that RNAi researcher Olivier Voinnet willfully misrepresented data published in several journals.

1 Comment

image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

3 Comments

image: Vaccine Fraudster Gets Jail Time

Vaccine Fraudster Gets Jail Time

By | July 6, 2015

The researcher who spiked rabbit blood with human antibodies to make an HIV vaccine look more effective is sentenced to 57 months in prison and must repay his National Institutes of Health grant.

6 Comments

image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

14 Comments

image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.

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image: Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

By | June 1, 2015

The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.

4 Comments

image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

0 Comments

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