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» scientific misconduct and microbiology

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image: Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

By | December 10, 2012

Long-term exposure to antibiotics from agricultural run off may encourage the evolution of soil bacteria that break down and consume the antibacterial agents.

1 Comment

image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

1 Comment

image: Social Psychology Damned Again

Social Psychology Damned Again

By | November 30, 2012

An exhaustive report about research fraud committed by social psychologist Diederik Stapel paints a picture of a field beset by sloppy practices and low standards.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

1 Comment

image: A Decade of Misconduct

A Decade of Misconduct

By | November 27, 2012

A senior cardiovascular disease and diabetes researcher at the University of Kentucky has been found guilty of falsifying data over the past 10 years.

12 Comments

image: Microbial Life Beneath the Ice

Microbial Life Beneath the Ice

By | November 27, 2012

Researchers uncover a diverse microbial community living beneath 27 meters of ice in Antarctica’s Lake Vida.

1 Comment

image: Navel Bugs

Navel Bugs

By | November 12, 2012

A new study reveals a large mix of microbes in most human belly buttons.  

0 Comments

image: Setback for Malaria Vaccine

Setback for Malaria Vaccine

By | November 9, 2012

The malaria vaccine under development by GSK and the PATH initiative only protects about one in three babies, though some researchers say those odds are better than nothing.

0 Comments

image: Extra Vaccine Halts Mumps Outbreak

Extra Vaccine Halts Mumps Outbreak

By | November 8, 2012

A third dose of the MMR vaccine given during an intense outbreak appears to have provided herd-immunity to control the spread of the disease.

1 Comment

image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

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