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Cellular Research
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The Scientist

» scientific misconduct and microbiology

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image: Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

By | March 10, 2015

Microbes identified in a city’s sewage treatment plants correlate with the population’s obesity rate, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Judge: PubPeer Users Remain Anonymous

Judge: PubPeer Users Remain Anonymous

By | March 6, 2015

A Michigan judge denies a request to reveal the identities of commenters on the post-publication review website.

2 Comments

image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.

2 Comments

image: Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

By | March 2, 2015

The number of deaths attributable to certain medical probes may go beyond a recent outbreak in Los Angeles.

2 Comments

image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

3 Comments

image: HIV Scientist Pleads Guilty to Fraud

HIV Scientist Pleads Guilty to Fraud

By | February 26, 2015

A former Iowa State University researcher faces up to 10 years in prison for faking data involving a study of an HIV vaccine.

2 Comments

image: Medical Equipment May Spread Superbug

Medical Equipment May Spread Superbug

By | February 20, 2015

Drug-resistant bacteria have spread in a Los Angeles hospital, perhaps from contaminated endoscopes.

1 Comment

image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

0 Comments

image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

1 Comment

image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

3 Comments

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