The Scientist

» scientific misconduct and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Picturing Infection

Picturing Infection

By | January 1, 2015

Whole-animal, light-based imaging of infected small mammals

4 Comments

image: Top Science Scandals of 2014

Top Science Scandals of 2014

By | December 25, 2014

The stem cell that never was; post-publication peer review website faces legal trouble; biosecurity breaches at federal labs

4 Comments

image: Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

Measuring DNA with a Smartphone

By | December 23, 2014

A new microscope attachment can allow smartphone users to take a closer look at fluorescently labeled DNA.

0 Comments

image: Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

Imagining a “World Without Microbes”

By | December 18, 2014

Eradication of microbial disease likely accompanied by poor quality of life for remaining species

0 Comments

image: Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

Microbes Could Help Solve Sex Crimes

By | December 17, 2014

Microbial species found in pubic hair samples could help track down criminals.

0 Comments

image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

1 Comment

image: Microflora for Hire

Microflora for Hire

By | December 1, 2014

The guts of cows and termites harbor microbes that are renowned complex-carbohydrate digesters, but the human gastrointestinal tract has flora that just might measure up.

2 Comments

image: Polymerase Pieces

Polymerase Pieces

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers discover a new subunit of a bacterial RNA polymerase—as well as hints of its potential role in defending against viruses.

0 Comments

image: Virus Protects Mouse Gut

Virus Protects Mouse Gut

By | November 19, 2014

A murine norovirus appears to recover some of the functions of commensal bacteria in the guts of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice.

1 Comment

image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is strongly associated with sea star wasting disease.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  2. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
  3. Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
The Scientist