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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.

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image: Unconscious Effort

Unconscious Effort

By | September 16, 2014

People can categorize words while asleep, a study shows.

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image: Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

By | September 4, 2014

A study that identified genes linked to communication between different areas of the brain has been retracted by its authors because of statistical flaws. 

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image: Filling In the Notes

Filling In the Notes

By | September 1, 2014

Why the brain produces musical hallucinations

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: TS Live: Handy Apes

TS Live: Handy Apes

By | September 1, 2014

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

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image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

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image: PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

By | August 19, 2014

The moderators of the post-publication peer review forum say they could be facing their first legal case.

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image: The Price Tag of Scientific Fraud

The Price Tag of Scientific Fraud

By | August 15, 2014

Each paper retracted because of research misconduct costs taxpayers roughly $400,000, according to a report.

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image: Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

Lab-Grown 3-D Brain Tissue Mimics Cortex

By | August 11, 2014

From cortical neurons, researchers have engineered rat tissue that formed complex networks of functioning neurons and appeared to behave normally after an injury.

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