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ACLU lawyers representing the post-publication peer review site have filed a motion to admit the existence of a university investigation that found pathologist Fazlul Sarkar guilty of misconduct.

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image: Misconduct Finding Could Impact PubPeer Litigation

Misconduct Finding Could Impact PubPeer Litigation

By | October 19, 2016

Wayne State University’s conclusion that pathologist Fazlul Sarkar committed research misconduct could affect the ongoing legal proceedings related to anonymous critics of his work.

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A Wayne State University probe into allegations of research misconduct leveled against pathologist Fazlul Sarkar has found the scientist guilty of multiple instances of image manipulation, among other infractions.

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image: Nascent Neurons Journey Through Newborn Brain

Nascent Neurons Journey Through Newborn Brain

By | October 6, 2016

Young cells make their way to the frontal lobe to create new circuits in the brains of infants, researchers report. 

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image: Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

By | October 6, 2016

Allen Roses, a professor of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine, has passed away at age 73.

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image: Bigger-Brained Species Have Longer Yawns

Bigger-Brained Species Have Longer Yawns

By | October 5, 2016

Yawn duration also correlates with the number of cortical neurons, according to a study.

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image: Zika Infects Adult Monkeys’ Brains

Zika Infects Adult Monkeys’ Brains

By | October 5, 2016

A laboratory study finds the virus in the cerebellum in addition to body fluids.

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image: Evidence Lacking for Brain-Training Products

Evidence Lacking for Brain-Training Products

By | October 4, 2016

A literature review finds little evidence that commercial brain-training games can improve everyday cognitive performance, citing methodological shortcomings.

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image: An Evolutionary History

An Evolutionary History

By | October 1, 2016

Celebrating 30 years and a resurrection

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image: Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

By | October 1, 2016

Photon emissions in the brain are red-shifted in more-intelligent species, though scientists dispute what that means.

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