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image: Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

By | July 8, 2015

A reanalysis calls into question a year-old claim that humans can decipher at least 1 trillion different scents.

2 Comments

image: Vaccine Fraudster Gets Jail Time

Vaccine Fraudster Gets Jail Time

By | July 6, 2015

The researcher who spiked rabbit blood with human antibodies to make an HIV vaccine look more effective is sentenced to 57 months in prison and must repay his National Institutes of Health grant.

6 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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image: Keeping Science Pubs Clean

Keeping Science Pubs Clean

By | June 29, 2015

Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.

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image: New Human Brain Language Map

New Human Brain Language Map

By | June 26, 2015

Researchers find that Wernicke’s area, thought to be the seat of language comprehension in the human brain for more than a century, is not.

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image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

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image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

1 Comment

image: Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

By | June 15, 2015

This helps the insects collect as much visual information as possible from the gently swaying flowers on which they dine.

1 Comment

image: The Roots of Schizophrenia

The Roots of Schizophrenia

By | June 4, 2015

Researchers link disease-associated mutations to excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain.

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image: Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study

By | June 1, 2015

The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.

4 Comments

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