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image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

2 Comments

image: ORI Names New Director

ORI Names New Director

By | December 6, 2015

Neuroscientist Kathryn Partin will lead the US Office of Research Integrity.

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

3 Comments

image: Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

Scientific Misconduct: Red Flags

By | December 1, 2015

Warning signs that scandal might be brewing in your lab  

5 Comments

image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

1 Comment

image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

0 Comments

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