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image: Social Psychology Damned Again

Social Psychology Damned Again

By | November 30, 2012

An exhaustive report about research fraud committed by social psychologist Diederik Stapel paints a picture of a field beset by sloppy practices and low standards.

4 Comments

image: Art Through the Nose

Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.

3 Comments

image: A Decade of Misconduct

A Decade of Misconduct

By | November 27, 2012

A senior cardiovascular disease and diabetes researcher at the University of Kentucky has been found guilty of falsifying data over the past 10 years.

12 Comments

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

1 Comment

image: Sandy’s Impact on Science

Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

0 Comments

image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

image: Military Mind Wars

Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

image: Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

By | November 1, 2012

On the bicentennial of his birth, Edward Lear is celebrated for his whimsical poetry and his stunningly accurate scientific illustrations.

1 Comment

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