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image: Week in Review: June 3–7

Week in Review: June 3–7

By | June 7, 2013

Crowdsourcing biomedical research; bird flu contagion?; zebrafish shed light on inherited muscle disorder; the economics of the Human Genome Project; the epigenetics of pair bonding

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image: Optogenetics and OCD

Optogenetics and OCD

By | June 6, 2013

Stimulating brain cells with light reveals the dysfunctional circuitry that causes obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

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image: The Next Big One

The Next Big One

By | June 1, 2013

As new infections surface and spread, science meets the challenges with ingenuity and adaptation.

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image: Factoring in Face Time

Factoring in Face Time

By | June 1, 2013

How the study of human social interactions is helping researchers understand the spread of diseases like influenza and HIV

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image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

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