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The Scientist

» scientific misconduct and ecology

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image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

Mary O’Connor: Warming Up

By | June 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia. Age: 34

1 Comment

image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

3 Comments

image: Salamander Evolution

Salamander Evolution

By | June 1, 2013

Yale University evolutionary biologist Steven Brady studies the evolutionary impacts of roads on the amphibians.

2 Comments

image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review, May 13–17

Week in Review, May 13–17

By | May 17, 2013

Reading pathogen epigenomes; a new stem cell; dealing with research misconduct; monkey fossils; exploratory mice grow new neurons; watching metamorphosis

0 Comments

image: Ladybird Bioterrorists

Ladybird Bioterrorists

By | May 16, 2013

The Asian harlequin ladybird carries a biological weapon to wipe out competing species.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.

9 Comments

image: Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

By | May 14, 2013

Should institutions invest in changing the behavior of scientists found guilty of violating research rules and ethics?

3 Comments

image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

1 Comment

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