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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Something Is Killing Asian Carp

Something Is Killing Asian Carp

By | April 29, 2014

Half a million invasive silver carp are dead in a Kentucky river, and nobody knows why.

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image: STAP Misconduct Investigator Steps Down

STAP Misconduct Investigator Steps Down

By | April 25, 2014

One of the RIKEN scientists investigating allegations of misconduct tied to stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency work has resigned from the committee because of anonymous questions raised about his own research.

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image: Misconduct Found in STAP Case

Misconduct Found in STAP Case

By | April 2, 2014

An investigating committee at Japan’s RIKEN research center finds evidence of falsification and fabrication in two recent Nature papers that touted a new way to induce pluripotency.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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image: Python Auto-Pilot

Python Auto-Pilot

By | March 20, 2014

Invasive snakes in Florida show evidence of a compass sense they use to navigate back to home territory.

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image: Old-School Fish Guides

Old-School Fish Guides

By | March 18, 2014

Experienced fish may be critical for keeping migrating populations on track, a study finds.

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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

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image: Top US Scientific Misconduct Official Quits

Top US Scientific Misconduct Official Quits

By | March 14, 2014

The director of the Office of Research Integrity, the federal agency that investigates scientific misconduct, resigns after two years on the job.

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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