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image: For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival

By | May 29, 2014

Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.


image: Top 10 New Species

Top 10 New Species

By | May 23, 2014

The International Institute for Species Exploration announces its picks of novel species discovered in the past year, including a carnivorous mammal, a tiny shrimp, and a fungus.


image: Back from the Blacklist?

Back from the Blacklist?

By | May 8, 2014

Disgraced psychology researcher Marc Hauser, who was found guilty of data fabrication and falsification during his time at Harvard, publishes two new papers.

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image: RIKEN to Review 20,000 Papers

RIKEN to Review 20,000 Papers

By | May 5, 2014

In the wake of allegations of research misconduct, the president of the Japanese research institute asks that all labs review their publications for evidence of manipulated images or plagiarism.


image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.


image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.


image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.


image: STAP Misconduct Investigator Steps Down

STAP Misconduct Investigator Steps Down

By | April 25, 2014

One of the RIKEN scientists investigating allegations of misconduct tied to stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency work has resigned from the committee because of anonymous questions raised about his own research.


image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.


image: Stripes Shoo Flies

Stripes Shoo Flies

By | April 4, 2014

Zebras evolved stripes to prevent pesky biting flies from landing on them, a study finds.

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