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image: Social Psychology Damned Again

Social Psychology Damned Again

By | November 30, 2012

An exhaustive report about research fraud committed by social psychologist Diederik Stapel paints a picture of a field beset by sloppy practices and low standards.

4 Comments

image: A Decade of Misconduct

A Decade of Misconduct

By | November 27, 2012

A senior cardiovascular disease and diabetes researcher at the University of Kentucky has been found guilty of falsifying data over the past 10 years.

12 Comments

image: Charles Darwin for Congress

Charles Darwin for Congress

By | November 13, 2012

Nominated as a write-in candidate as a protest against the anti-science incumbent, famed naturalist Charles Darwin won 4,000 congressional votes in a Georgia county.

1 Comment

image: Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

Do Innocent Errors Cause Most Retractions?

By | November 2, 2012

Contrary to previous studies, a new publication finds that most retractions from scholarly literature are not due to misconduct.  

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.

2 Comments

image: Fraud Breeds Retractions

Fraud Breeds Retractions

By | October 1, 2012

An analysis of retractions dating back to 1977 shows that most papers are retracted due to misconduct.

2 Comments

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

0 Comments

image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

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