The Scientist

» regeneration and developmental biology

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image: Skin-to-Liver Cell Shortcut

Skin-to-Liver Cell Shortcut

By | February 23, 2014

Researchers use an adapted reprogramming technique to generate hepatocytes for the repopulation of an injured mouse liver.

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image: Neural Target for Autism?

Neural Target for Autism?

By | February 7, 2014

Mouse and rat models of the developmental disorder responded positively to a drug given to their mothers a day before birth.


image: An Offensive Playbook

An Offensive Playbook

By | February 1, 2014

Developing nonaddictive drugs to combat pain


image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

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image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation


image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.


image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue


image: Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

By | December 17, 2013

A microtubule-severing enzyme curbs the regeneration of damaged nerve cells.

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image: Like New Again

Like New Again

By | November 11, 2013

Scientists show that reactivation of an RNA-binding protein in damaged adult tissues can lead to improved regeneration.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39


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