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image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

image: Next Generation: Painless Vaccine Patch

Next Generation: Painless Vaccine Patch

By | April 2, 2012

Vaccination via tiny microneedles elicits a powerful immune response in the skin.

8 Comments

image: Telltale Tortoises

Telltale Tortoises

By | April 1, 2012

Researchers are permanently marking endangered reptiles in Madagascar to keep the animals from entering the illegal wildlife trade. Read the full story. [gallery]

4 Comments

image: Marked for Life

Marked for Life

By | April 1, 2012

Conservationists working in Madagascar are doing the unthinkable—defacing the shells of endangered ploughshare tortoises—but it may be the animals’ last hope.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Saving an Owl from Politics

Opinion: Saving an Owl from Politics

By | March 26, 2012

The imperiled northern spotted owl faces extinction if efforts enacted to save it continue to put politics ahead of science.

22 Comments

image: Let Them Eat Dirt

Let Them Eat Dirt

By | March 22, 2012

Early exposure to microbes shapes the mammalian immune system by subduing inflammatory T cells.

28 Comments

image: Immune Role in Brain Disorder?

Immune Role in Brain Disorder?

By | March 19, 2012

Replacing immune cells in a mouse model of Rett syndrome, a developmental brain disorder, improved symptoms, suggesting a new target for treatment.

2 Comments

image: New Frog Species in NYC?

New Frog Species in NYC?

By | March 15, 2012

Genetic data support designating a New York City-area leopard frog as a unique species.

0 Comments

image: Transplant Without Drugs?

Transplant Without Drugs?

By | March 8, 2012

A new method for transplanting immunologically mismatched organs may remove the need for life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection.

6 Comments

image: Self-cloning Coral

Self-cloning Coral

By | March 1, 2012

Coral embryos broken apart by waves can continue developing into adult clones.

0 Comments

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