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The Scientist

» conservation and immunology

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image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

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image: Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

By | March 19, 2014

Exposure to vitamin A in the womb influences immune system development and lifelong ability to fight infections, a mouse study shows. 

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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