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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

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image: Inflammation for Regeneration

Inflammation for Regeneration

By | November 8, 2012

Inflammatory signals in injured zebrafish brains promote the growth of new neurons.

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image: Little Fish in a Big Pond

Little Fish in a Big Pond

By | November 1, 2012

Continued overfishing of forage fish such as sardines and herring can result in devastating ecological and economic outcomes.

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image: Opinion: Fishy Deaths

Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

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image: Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

By | October 29, 2012

Mice fed a mix of six strains of bacteria were able to fight a C. difficile infection that causes deadly diarrhea and is resistant to most types of treatment.

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image: Ancient Viruses Wreak New Havoc

Ancient Viruses Wreak New Havoc

By | October 24, 2012

Viral DNA in mice genomes may lead to cancer in immune-compromised animals.

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image: Conservation Will Cost $76 Billion

Conservation Will Cost $76 Billion

By | October 12, 2012

Researchers estimate annual investment needed to conserve habitats and save the world’s most at-risk species.

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