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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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De-extinction efforts could divert resources away from conserving endangered species.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center researcher links complex traits to the genes that underlie them.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: Image of the Day: Eye in the Sky

Image of the Day: Eye in the Sky

By | January 31, 2017

Scientists use remote sensing data from satellites to map biodiversity in the Amazon and Peruvian Andes forests.

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image: Tigers May Get a Second Chance in Central Asia

Tigers May Get a Second Chance in Central Asia

By | January 25, 2017

Before their extinction in the 1960s, Caspian tigers once roamed Central Asia. Now scientists want to bring Amur Tiger cubs to areas where the extinct subspecies once lived.

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