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image: Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

By | April 1, 2012

A flood of new discoveries has refined our definition of cancer stem cells. Now it’s up to human clinical trials to test if they can make a difference in patients.

48 Comments

image: Opinion: Saving an Owl from Politics

Opinion: Saving an Owl from Politics

By | March 26, 2012

The imperiled northern spotted owl faces extinction if efforts enacted to save it continue to put politics ahead of science.

22 Comments

image: New Frog Species in NYC?

New Frog Species in NYC?

By | March 15, 2012

Genetic data support designating a New York City-area leopard frog as a unique species.

0 Comments

image: Self-cloning Coral

Self-cloning Coral

By | March 1, 2012

Coral embryos broken apart by waves can continue developing into adult clones.

0 Comments

image: Coral Clones

Coral Clones

By | March 1, 2012

The colorful and fragile start to the life of a living reef

0 Comments

image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

0 Comments

image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

2 Comments

image: Preserving Endangered Gametes

Preserving Endangered Gametes

By | March 1, 2012

Pierre Comizzoli, a reproductive physiologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, chats about his efforts to rescue endangered species from extinction using in vitro fertilization as well as novel gamete preservation techniques.

2 Comments

image: Test-Tube Zoo Babies

Test-Tube Zoo Babies

By | March 1, 2012

A National Zoo researcher works to perfect gamete preservation and in vitro fertilization techniques in order to better manage endangered populations.

0 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

0 Comments

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