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image: Identifying Wolves by Their Howls

Identifying Wolves by Their Howls

By | July 23, 2013

Researchers can tell wolves apart by analyzing the pitch and volume of their vocalizations.

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image: Russia Blocks Antarctic Reserves

Russia Blocks Antarctic Reserves

By | July 17, 2013

A Russian delegation vetoes proposals to create several new marine sanctuaries in the seas surrounding Antarctica.

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image: The Turtle That Never Was

The Turtle That Never Was

By | July 1, 2013

A species of freshwater turtle deemed to be extinct may never have existed in the first place.

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image: New Species on the Block

New Species on the Block

By | June 27, 2013

A bird living in the Cambodian capital is named as a new species.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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image: Dog Disease Threatens Tigers

Dog Disease Threatens Tigers

By | June 11, 2013

Wildlife veterinarians plan to track the canine distemper virus in Indonesia.

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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

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image: Bird Bullies

Bird Bullies

By | June 1, 2013

Regular supplies of food for scavenger birds in Spain may not be the most effective conservation strategy, as smaller birds are bullied away.

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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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